Chabichou De Poitou

Chabichou De Poitou

French goats' milk cheese from one of the most significant goat rearing regions; Poitou Charante area.

£9.25
PLU 169

Nutrition

  • IngredientsGoats' Milk, Salt, Rennet, Dairy Cultures (Milk)
  • AllergensMilk

Nutritional Information

    • Energy kJ1136
    • Energy kcal274
    • Fat22.74
    • Of which saturates16
    • Carbohydrates0.78
    • Of which sugars0.78
    • Protein16.2
    • Salt1.0
    Name & address of food supplier

    Paxton & Whitfield Ltd, 93 Jermyn Street, London SW1Y 6JE

    These summary details have been prepared for information purposes only. While we have taken care in preparing this summary and believe it is accurate, it is not a substitute for reading the product packaging and label prior to use. Paxton & Whitfield is unable to accept liability for any incorrect information. If you require specific advice, please contact our mail order team on 01451 823460 or email sales@paxtonandwhitfield.co.uk.

About

When young, Chabichou du Poitou is white and fresh with a delicate aroma and taste. As it ages past 10 days, it picks up natural blue and grey moulds in the rind. Its texture becomes more crumbly and the flavour becomes sharper, with a stronger taste of goat's milk.

The Moors, who occupied the Poitou region in the 8th Century until they were defeated at the Battle of Poitiers in 732AD, are said to have bred goats and made cheese fromt heir milk. It is from the Arabic word for goat, "Chabli", that this cheese has taken its name.

Now the Poitou Charente area of France is one of the most significant goat rearing regions, with both farmhouse and industrial cheese production taking place. This Chabichou is a "fermier" or farmhouse cheese and comes from the producer Georgelet, who learnt the traditional cheese making methods through watching the women of his village making cheese as a child.

It takes 1 litre of milk to make every individual Chabichou. The curds are not cut or heated to encourage the draining of the whey but delicately ladled into small moulds with fine holes in the sides and the base that allow the whey to drain.